Obamacare upheld again: Consequences for Business Owners and Investors

Presidential Seal

 

 

 

 

Last week the Supreme Court ruled that all qualifying Americans are entitled to receive subsidies to purchase health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, regardless of where in the country they live.  The decision leaves the status quo in place but nonetheless raises considerations for investors and business owners:

  • As interpreted by the Administration, the ACA requires small business owners with more than fifty employees to provide health coverage to their employees beginning in 2016.
  • There remains a concern about inadequate ACA enrollment, particularly by middle- and higher-income Americans.  If enrollment continues to lag, it could lead to significant premium increases, as the insurance pool will not have sufficient “good” risks to balance out the less favorable ones.
  • Speaker Boehner’s legal action against President Obama remains outstanding.  Boehner’s suit objects to the Administration’s unilateral decisions to delay the employer mandate and to reimburse insurance carriers for losses incurred from insuring high-risk people.  A Boehner victory (which most legal experts consider a long shot) could end the carrier subsidies, which likely would prompt carriers to increase premiums or cut coverage to recoup the lost revenue.
  • The decision avoids a decline in health care stock values.  Many companies – particularly for-profit hospitals – benefit from the greater insurance coverage provided by the ACA.  However, premium increases discussed above could cause the feared “death spiral”, in which higher premiums leads to fewer healthy enrollees, which leads to higher premiums, etc.  That consequence could hurt health care stock values down the road.
  • The decision eliminates any realistic possibility of repeal of the 3.8% surtax on investment income for higher-income taxpayers.  Revenue from that tax is used to pay for the bulk of the insurance subsidies that the Court upheld.  There is no realistic prospect of a reduction in tax rates in sight.

 


Andrew H. Friedman is the principal of The Washington Update LLC and a former senior partner in a Washington, D.C. law firm.  He speaks regularly on legislative and regulatory developments and trends affecting investment, insurance, and retirement products.  He may be reached at www.TheWashingtonUpdate.com.

Neither the author of this paper, nor any law firm with which the author may be associated, is providing legal or tax advice as to the matters discussed herein.  The discussion herein is general in nature and is provided for informational purposes only.  There is no guarantee as to its accuracy or completeness.  It is not intended as legal or tax advice and individuals may not rely upon it (including for purposes of avoiding tax penalties imposed by the IRS or state and local tax authorities).  Individuals should consult their own legal and tax counsel as to matters discussed herein and before entering into any estate planning, trust, investment, retirement, or insurance arrangement.

Copyright Andrew H. Friedman 2015.  Reprinted by permission.  All rights reserved.

What is the Generation Skipping Transfer Tax?

Recently, M Financial posted a brief blog on the generation skipping transfer tax.  Please copy and paste the link below into your internet browser to read.Transfer Tax

http://mfin.com/m-intelligence-details/Understanding the Generation Skipping Transfer Tax

 

Life Insurance in a Rising Tax Environment

In March, we posted an article about investing in a rising tax environment.  We at WealthPoint thought the article in the link below would be a good follow up to that article.  Please take a moment to read through it.

Rising Tax Environment

Please click the link below.

WP_Marketing Intelligence Report – Life Insurance in a Rising Tax Environment

Wake Me Up When September Ends

Please read this article written by Andrew Friedman of The Washington Update LLC

In my legislative update early this year, I noted that ongoing acrimony between Congressional Republicans and the Obama White House likely precludes agreement on any broad new legislative initiatives this year.  Instead, Congress and the White House are likely to reach agreement only in the face of “forcing events” – deadlines that compel action to ward off a draconian result.

As it turns out, Congress appears to be arranging for all of the major deadlines to occur around a single date – September 30.  This schedule sets up a massive negotiation for September, when Congress returns from summer recess.  Investors should be aware that this negotiation is likely to lead to market volatility and some new tax changes.

I discuss the upcoming imbroglio in more detail below.  But first, two quick announcements:

  • The Affordable Care Act is affecting retiree medical costs in a number of ways, most of them adverse.  A new white paper on the site, Preparing for Rising Medical Costs in Retirement, discusses how retirees and near retirees can develop an estimate of their likely retirement medical costs and a plan to help defray those expenses.  Subscribers can access the paper here.
  • My colleague Jeff Bush recently launched a new way for you to keep with what he and I are reading each day.  You can now follow us on Facebook to see our daily must read articles:  https://lnkd.in/eJAdh88 .  This is our way of keeping you abreast of the latest happenings out of Washington, happenings that can affect your investments and your business.

Now back to the legislative outlook.  By or around September 30, Washington must reach agreement on:

  • Raising the debt ceiling:  Congressional borrowing authority ended on March 15, 2015.  Current estimates suggest the government will run out of money and need to borrow by around early October.  Failure to raise the debt limit by that time would impinge on the government’s ability to pay interest on debt outstanding, leading to default on U.S. debt.
  • Highway funding:  Funding for summer infrastructure work (road and bridge repair) runs out on May 31.  All indications are that Congress will pass a short term “patch”, funding construction through September 30.  After that date, Congress will need to find a permanent source for highway funding.
  • Government funding:  The federal government’s fiscal year ends on September 30.  By that date Congress must appropriate money to run the government next year.  Otherwise the federal government will shut down on October 1.
  • Tax extenders:  Congress wants to extend a popular group of tax provisions that expired at the end of last year.  Paul Ryan, the chairman of the House Ways and Means (tax writing) committee, said he wants to take up the extenders during the funding discussions in September.

Longtime readers will remember that Washington reached a similar September 30 impasse two years ago, causing the government to shut down for sixteen days beginning October 1, 2013.  In that instance, with the debt limit deadline approaching, Congress and the White House agreed on a plan to reopen the government and raise the debt ceiling.  That plan included caps on future spending on defense and domestic programs.

As in 2013, reaching consensus on these knotty budget issues will be challenging.  With U.S. military involvement expanding, both parties agree that next year’s defense budget must be higher than the spending caps set in the wake of the 2013 budget impasse.  The President, though, insists that any increase in defense spending be matched with a corresponding increase in spending on domestic programs.  Republicans not only oppose additional spending on domestic programs, they are looking to further cut those expenditures.

For investors, the September 30 deadline is important for two reasons.  First, as the deadline to raise the debt ceiling gets closer and Congress and the Administration (likely) continue to bicker, the markets often turn volatile.  I have long said that a market decline over concern about Congress’ impending failure to act is a buying opportunity.  Congress will act – likely at the last minute – at which point the market will recover.  It is incumbent on investors and financial advisors to keep these “forcing event” dates in mind as investment opportunities.

Second, meeting these deadlines requires funding for new government initiatives, such as additional defense spending and funding long-term highway construction.  Congress typically does not like to spend money unless it raises taxes (or cuts spending elsewhere) to defray the additional cost.  Congress thus searches for “loophole closers”– provisions in the tax code that arguably provide unduly favorable benefits.  (An example of a loophole closer that keeps arising – but has never been enacted – is to curtail the use of “stretch” IRAs and 401(k)s.)  Thus, as September approaches, investors would be wise to consider how Congress intends to fund additional expenditures.

One way to fund these new initiatives could be corporate tax reform.  As if addressing these deadlines was not enough, Chairman Ryan hopes to have a corporate tax reform plan ready by the end of the summer.  (It appears that reforming individual taxes is now recognized as too difficult politically.)  If Congress and the White House can agree on corporate reform (possible but difficult), then the funds from a deemed (Democrats) or optional (Republicans) one-time repatriation of foreign earnings could be used to fund the permanent highway bill.  Otherwise, Congress will have to find revenue raisers to pay for highway funding and extenders; Ryan says using repatriation funding without tax reform is a no go.

 

Andrew H. Friedman is the principal of The Washington Update LLC and a former senior partner in a Washington, D.C. law firm.  He speaks regularly on legislative and regulatory developments and trends affecting investment, insurance, and retirement products.  He may be reached at www.TheWashingtonUpdate.com.

Neither the author of this paper, nor any law firm with which the author may be associated, is providing legal or tax advice as to the matters discussed herein.  The discussion herein is general in nature and is provided for informational purposes only.  There is no guarantee as to its accuracy or completeness.  It is not intended as legal or tax advice and individuals may not rely upon it (including for purposes of avoiding tax penalties imposed by the IRS or state and local tax authorities).  Individuals should consult their own legal and tax counsel as to matters discussed herein and before entering into any estate planning, trust, investment, retirement, or insurance arrangement.

Copyright Andrew H. Friedman 2015.  Reprinted by permission.  All rights reserved.

Life Insurance Basics

M Financial put together a piece on life insurance basics that we thought our readers would find educational.  Please take a moment to read through it and use it as a reference.

To view the file, select the link below:

WP_Life Insurance Basics

Life Insurance Policy

 

U.S. HOUSE PASSES ESTATE TAX REPEAL DESPITE VETO THREAT

US House of Rep

By Richard Cowan and David Lawder

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. House of Representatives on Thursday ignored a White House veto threat and passed legislation to repeal the estate tax that hits inherited assets worth $5.4 million or more.

By a mostly partisan 240-179 vote, the Republican-backed bill will be sent to the Senate, where Democrats are expected to use procedural hurdles to try to block it. Even if it passes the Senate, it would likely fail to achieve a two-thirds majority needed to override a veto.

House passage was timed for the week when most Americans file their tax returns. Conservatives, who refer to the estate tax as the “death tax,” have long railed against it, arguing it hurts the families of small business owners and farmers.

“It’s past time to repeal this unacceptable tax. Every American deserves the ability to pass their life’s savings to their kids,” said Representative Tom Graves, a conservative Republican from Georgia.

Repealing the tax would boost the federal deficit by about $269 billion over 10 years, according to Congress’ Joint Committee on Taxation.

Few Americans pay the 40 percent tax on assets above the $5.4 million exclusion amount. About 5,400 estates, equal to 0.2 percent of taxpayers, will owe such taxes in 2015, according to the JCT.

(Reporting By Richard Cowan and David Lawder; Editing by Dan Grebler)

The Impact of True Collaboration

Recently, Ryan and Tim were asked by STAFDA, a large national trade association we have spoken to, to write an article for their upcoming trade magazine.  This article highlights the impact of collaboration with an entrepreneurial family group and their advisory team.

Please click the link below to view the PDF file.

The Impact of True Collaboration – Ryan Barradas – Tim Young

Common Life Insurance Mistakes

We at WealthPoint continually strive to provide insight to our clients and advisory community.  The attached piece was written by M Financial and discusses life insurance policy issues that have been encountered through the years.  Please click the link to review the white paper.

 

 WP_AMI_Common Life Insurance MistakesMistake

Obama comments on IRA fiduciary rules

Presidential Seal[The update is of interest primarily to financial advisors.]

Last week the President gave a speech in which he focused on forthcoming Labor Department rules intended to ensure that IRA holders receive investment advice unencumbered by financial advisor conflicts of interest.  In conjunction with the President’s speech, the Labor Department will be re-issuing proposed rules addressing the extent to which financial advisors may receive compensation in connection with investments made by IRAs and other retirement accounts they advise.  The new proposed rules should be available in the next 60-90 days.

The Labor Department first issued proposed rules on this subject in 2010.  Of great concern to the financial services industry, the 2010 proposed regulations effectively would have precluded financial advisors from receiving commissions and other payments on IRA transactions and investments.  DOL withdrew the proposal in 2011 due to public pressure and concern.

The President’s comments last week contained a good bit of anti-Wall Street rhetoric (“A system where Wall Street firms benefit from backdoor payments and hidden fees if they talk responsible Americans into buying bad retirement investments – with high costs and low returns – instead of recommending quality investments – isn’t fair.”).  They make clear that the Administration is determined to continue to press this issue in some form.  At the same time, the White House material accompanying the comments states that the new proposal will “ensure that all common forms of compensation, such as commissions and revenue sharing, are still permitted.”  This language suggests that the new proposal will be more lenient than the original.

For instance, the new proposal could permit all forms of advisor compensation but require the advisor to disclose to the client conflicts of interest, such as where particular investments result in higher commissions or other payments to the advisor.

The Administration’s continued concern about arrangements that heretofore had not been thought to pose problems is worrisome from the perspective of the securities industry.  On the other hand, the fact that all forms of compensation will remain acceptable suggests that the newly proposed regulations will be at least somewhat less harsh.  My guess is that the industry is still likely to be unhappy with the new proposal, and will push back once it is announced.  The DOL has said the public will have the opportunity to comment on the proposal, including at a public hearing, before final regulations go into effect, so the matter is far from resolved.

 


Andrew H. Friedman is the principal of The Washington Update LLC and a former senior partner in a Washington, D.C. law firm. He speaks regularly on legislative and regulatory developments and trends affecting investment, insurance, and retirement products. He may be reached at www.TheWashingtonUpdate.com.

Neither the author of this paper, nor any law firm with which the author may be associated, is providing legal or tax advice as to the matters discussed herein. The discussion herein is general in nature and is provided for informational purposes only. There is no guarantee as to its accuracy or completeness. It is not intended as legal or tax advice and individuals may not rely upon it (including for purposes of avoiding tax penalties imposed by the IRS or state and local tax authorities). Individuals should consult their own legal and tax counsel as to matters discussed herein and before entering into any estate planning, trust, investment, retirement, or insurance arrangement.

Copyright Andrew H. Friedman 2015. Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

 

Importance of Life Insurance Policy Reviews

M Financial is constantly writing material for member firms to share with the advisor community and clients on the subject of life insurance.  WealthPoint is a member firm of M Financial and we wanted to make this article available.

WP_AMI_May 2014_Importance of Life Insurance Policy Reviews

Click on the link above to view the full article (PDF)