WealthPoint Announces New Insurance Partner

DENVER, March 16, 2017 – WealthPoint, a leading provider of business and life insurance advisory services with a focus on succession, exit and wealth transfer planning to entrepreneurial family groups and affluent clients throughout the U.S., expands into the Denver market with the hiring of Kevin McMahon, its newest Insurance Partner. “Adding Kevin to our team enables us to provide our insurance and business advisory services to the Denver market,” said WealthPoint’s Managing Partner, Ryan Barradas. “Kevin brings a tremendous amount of respect within the Advisor community. His reputation and experience in the insurance industry put us in a position for sustained success.”

Kevin brings a wealth of experience in both employee benefits and life insurance. In 1980, Kevin founded McMahon & Co., an employee benefits consulting business, and successfully managed it for 30 years until he sold it. Since then, he founded KMM, LLC, an independent, client focused insurance practice. He has a proven track record of consistently identifying the best solutions for his clients, which he has demonstrated throughout his successful career. His core belief and determination to put his client’s needs first, are directly aligned with WealthPoint’s mantra, Know your story.

“I’m excited to take the next step in my career with WealthPoint,” says Kevin. “I look forward to joining a firm that has the staff, processes and resources in place to allow me to best service our entrepreneurial and affluent clientele.”

Government funding and tax extenders legislation affects investors

After weeks of negotiations, Congress reached agreement on a bipartisan bill to fund the government through September 2016.  Following are provisions of particular interest to investors.

The legislation makes permanent (including retroactively for 2015) some provisions that previously had expired every few years:

  • IRA / charitable contribution provision for account holders over age 70-1/2
  • Tax credit for research and development expenditures
  • Enhanced write-off of small business capital expenses under section 179

The legislation extends (including retroactively for 2015) other provisions:

  • Extension and phase out of bonus depreciation through 2019

The legislation includes a number of new provisions:

  • Repeals the forty-year-old prohibition on exports of domestically produced crude oil
  • Expands 529 plan qualifying distributions to include student computers and technology

The legislation delays sources of funding and government reimbursements under the Affordable Care Act:

  • “Cadillac tax”(40%)  imposed on high cost employer health plans delayed until 2020; thereafter tax becomes deductible
  • Medical device tax delayed until 2018
  • Annual fee on health insurance provider premiums written (“belly button tax”) delayed until 2018
  • Government reimbursements for insurance company losses limited to amounts collected from profitable insurers (reimbursement fund must be revenue neutral)

Of interest to financial advisors, the legislation:

  • Does not prevent the Department of Labor from finalizing and implementing the proposed IRA account fiduciary rules
  • Does not make significant changes to Dodd-Frank

 


Andrew H. Friedman is the principal of The Washington Update LLC and a former senior partner in a Washington, D.C. law firm.  He and his colleague Jeff Bush speak regularly on legislative and regulatory developments and trends affecting investment, insurance, and retirement products.  They may be reached at www.TheWashingtonUpdate.com.

The authors of this paper are not providing legal or tax advice as to the matters discussed herein.  The discussion herein is general in nature and is provided for informational purposes only.  There is no guarantee as to its accuracy or completeness.  It is not intended as legal or tax advice and individuals may not rely upon it (including for purposes of avoiding tax penalties imposed by the IRS or state and local tax authorities).  Individuals should consult their own legal and tax counsel as to matters discussed herein and before entering into any estate planning, trust, investment, retirement, or insurance arrangement.

Copyright Andrew H. Friedman 2015.  Reprinted by permission.  All rights reserved.

Another government shutdown?

Congress returns from recess next week facing a month-end deadline to fund government operations for the next fiscal year. I’m concerned we could be looking at a reprise of 2013. That year, the federal government shut down on October 1 for sixteen days over a Republican proposal to defund the Affordable Care Act. Now, Republicans are talking about defunding Planned Parenthood, a proposal the President is almost certain to veto. More broadly, there is significant disagreement on funding for social programs generally (the President wants increased funding; the Republicans are calling for social program cuts). If these disagreements cannot be breached, the government faces an October 1 shutdown.

 

The difference this time is when the debt limit must be raised to allow the federal government to borrow additional funds. In 2013, the government ran out of money and had to borrow by mid-October, setting up an incontrovertible deadline that Congress had to address, reopening the government in the process. This year, we’re told that the government will not need to borrow more money before November or even December. So, if the government shuts down, what will force Congress to compromise and reopen it in the near term?

 

Historically, markets often are volatile as fiscal deadlines approach and Congress appears unable to agree on a solution – until it does. Investors might consider taking action to protect against volatility until these deadlines have been addressed. More aggressive investors might view a pullback as a buying opportunity; markets tend to recover nicely after Congress finally agrees to raise the nation’s borrowing limit (as Congress invariably will do here, likely at the last possible moment).

 


Andrew H. Friedman is the principal of The Washington Update LLC and a former senior partner in a Washington, D.C. law firm. He speaks regularly on legislative and regulatory developments and trends affecting investment, insurance, and retirement products. He may be reached at www.TheWashingtonUpdate.com.

Neither the author of this paper, nor any law firm with which the author may be associated, is providing legal or tax advice as to the matters discussed herein. The discussion herein is general in nature and is provided for informational purposes only. There is no guarantee as to its accuracy or completeness. It is not intended as legal or tax advice and individuals may not rely upon it (including for purposes of avoiding tax penalties imposed by the IRS or state and local tax authorities). Individuals should consult their own legal and tax counsel as to matters discussed herein and before entering into any estate planning, trust, investment, retirement, or insurance arrangement.

Copyright Andrew H. Friedman 2015. Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Obamacare upheld again: Consequences for Business Owners and Investors

Presidential Seal

 

 

 

 

Last week the Supreme Court ruled that all qualifying Americans are entitled to receive subsidies to purchase health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, regardless of where in the country they live.  The decision leaves the status quo in place but nonetheless raises considerations for investors and business owners:

  • As interpreted by the Administration, the ACA requires small business owners with more than fifty employees to provide health coverage to their employees beginning in 2016.
  • There remains a concern about inadequate ACA enrollment, particularly by middle- and higher-income Americans.  If enrollment continues to lag, it could lead to significant premium increases, as the insurance pool will not have sufficient “good” risks to balance out the less favorable ones.
  • Speaker Boehner’s legal action against President Obama remains outstanding.  Boehner’s suit objects to the Administration’s unilateral decisions to delay the employer mandate and to reimburse insurance carriers for losses incurred from insuring high-risk people.  A Boehner victory (which most legal experts consider a long shot) could end the carrier subsidies, which likely would prompt carriers to increase premiums or cut coverage to recoup the lost revenue.
  • The decision avoids a decline in health care stock values.  Many companies – particularly for-profit hospitals – benefit from the greater insurance coverage provided by the ACA.  However, premium increases discussed above could cause the feared “death spiral”, in which higher premiums leads to fewer healthy enrollees, which leads to higher premiums, etc.  That consequence could hurt health care stock values down the road.
  • The decision eliminates any realistic possibility of repeal of the 3.8% surtax on investment income for higher-income taxpayers.  Revenue from that tax is used to pay for the bulk of the insurance subsidies that the Court upheld.  There is no realistic prospect of a reduction in tax rates in sight.

 


Andrew H. Friedman is the principal of The Washington Update LLC and a former senior partner in a Washington, D.C. law firm.  He speaks regularly on legislative and regulatory developments and trends affecting investment, insurance, and retirement products.  He may be reached at www.TheWashingtonUpdate.com.

Neither the author of this paper, nor any law firm with which the author may be associated, is providing legal or tax advice as to the matters discussed herein.  The discussion herein is general in nature and is provided for informational purposes only.  There is no guarantee as to its accuracy or completeness.  It is not intended as legal or tax advice and individuals may not rely upon it (including for purposes of avoiding tax penalties imposed by the IRS or state and local tax authorities).  Individuals should consult their own legal and tax counsel as to matters discussed herein and before entering into any estate planning, trust, investment, retirement, or insurance arrangement.

Copyright Andrew H. Friedman 2015.  Reprinted by permission.  All rights reserved.

Wake Me Up When September Ends

Please read this article written by Andrew Friedman of The Washington Update LLC

In my legislative update early this year, I noted that ongoing acrimony between Congressional Republicans and the Obama White House likely precludes agreement on any broad new legislative initiatives this year.  Instead, Congress and the White House are likely to reach agreement only in the face of “forcing events” – deadlines that compel action to ward off a draconian result.

As it turns out, Congress appears to be arranging for all of the major deadlines to occur around a single date – September 30.  This schedule sets up a massive negotiation for September, when Congress returns from summer recess.  Investors should be aware that this negotiation is likely to lead to market volatility and some new tax changes.

I discuss the upcoming imbroglio in more detail below.  But first, two quick announcements:

  • The Affordable Care Act is affecting retiree medical costs in a number of ways, most of them adverse.  A new white paper on the site, Preparing for Rising Medical Costs in Retirement, discusses how retirees and near retirees can develop an estimate of their likely retirement medical costs and a plan to help defray those expenses.  Subscribers can access the paper here.
  • My colleague Jeff Bush recently launched a new way for you to keep with what he and I are reading each day.  You can now follow us on Facebook to see our daily must read articles:  https://lnkd.in/eJAdh88 .  This is our way of keeping you abreast of the latest happenings out of Washington, happenings that can affect your investments and your business.

Now back to the legislative outlook.  By or around September 30, Washington must reach agreement on:

  • Raising the debt ceiling:  Congressional borrowing authority ended on March 15, 2015.  Current estimates suggest the government will run out of money and need to borrow by around early October.  Failure to raise the debt limit by that time would impinge on the government’s ability to pay interest on debt outstanding, leading to default on U.S. debt.
  • Highway funding:  Funding for summer infrastructure work (road and bridge repair) runs out on May 31.  All indications are that Congress will pass a short term “patch”, funding construction through September 30.  After that date, Congress will need to find a permanent source for highway funding.
  • Government funding:  The federal government’s fiscal year ends on September 30.  By that date Congress must appropriate money to run the government next year.  Otherwise the federal government will shut down on October 1.
  • Tax extenders:  Congress wants to extend a popular group of tax provisions that expired at the end of last year.  Paul Ryan, the chairman of the House Ways and Means (tax writing) committee, said he wants to take up the extenders during the funding discussions in September.

Longtime readers will remember that Washington reached a similar September 30 impasse two years ago, causing the government to shut down for sixteen days beginning October 1, 2013.  In that instance, with the debt limit deadline approaching, Congress and the White House agreed on a plan to reopen the government and raise the debt ceiling.  That plan included caps on future spending on defense and domestic programs.

As in 2013, reaching consensus on these knotty budget issues will be challenging.  With U.S. military involvement expanding, both parties agree that next year’s defense budget must be higher than the spending caps set in the wake of the 2013 budget impasse.  The President, though, insists that any increase in defense spending be matched with a corresponding increase in spending on domestic programs.  Republicans not only oppose additional spending on domestic programs, they are looking to further cut those expenditures.

For investors, the September 30 deadline is important for two reasons.  First, as the deadline to raise the debt ceiling gets closer and Congress and the Administration (likely) continue to bicker, the markets often turn volatile.  I have long said that a market decline over concern about Congress’ impending failure to act is a buying opportunity.  Congress will act – likely at the last minute – at which point the market will recover.  It is incumbent on investors and financial advisors to keep these “forcing event” dates in mind as investment opportunities.

Second, meeting these deadlines requires funding for new government initiatives, such as additional defense spending and funding long-term highway construction.  Congress typically does not like to spend money unless it raises taxes (or cuts spending elsewhere) to defray the additional cost.  Congress thus searches for “loophole closers”– provisions in the tax code that arguably provide unduly favorable benefits.  (An example of a loophole closer that keeps arising – but has never been enacted – is to curtail the use of “stretch” IRAs and 401(k)s.)  Thus, as September approaches, investors would be wise to consider how Congress intends to fund additional expenditures.

One way to fund these new initiatives could be corporate tax reform.  As if addressing these deadlines was not enough, Chairman Ryan hopes to have a corporate tax reform plan ready by the end of the summer.  (It appears that reforming individual taxes is now recognized as too difficult politically.)  If Congress and the White House can agree on corporate reform (possible but difficult), then the funds from a deemed (Democrats) or optional (Republicans) one-time repatriation of foreign earnings could be used to fund the permanent highway bill.  Otherwise, Congress will have to find revenue raisers to pay for highway funding and extenders; Ryan says using repatriation funding without tax reform is a no go.

 

Andrew H. Friedman is the principal of The Washington Update LLC and a former senior partner in a Washington, D.C. law firm.  He speaks regularly on legislative and regulatory developments and trends affecting investment, insurance, and retirement products.  He may be reached at www.TheWashingtonUpdate.com.

Neither the author of this paper, nor any law firm with which the author may be associated, is providing legal or tax advice as to the matters discussed herein.  The discussion herein is general in nature and is provided for informational purposes only.  There is no guarantee as to its accuracy or completeness.  It is not intended as legal or tax advice and individuals may not rely upon it (including for purposes of avoiding tax penalties imposed by the IRS or state and local tax authorities).  Individuals should consult their own legal and tax counsel as to matters discussed herein and before entering into any estate planning, trust, investment, retirement, or insurance arrangement.

Copyright Andrew H. Friedman 2015.  Reprinted by permission.  All rights reserved.

U.S. HOUSE PASSES ESTATE TAX REPEAL DESPITE VETO THREAT

US House of Rep

By Richard Cowan and David Lawder

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. House of Representatives on Thursday ignored a White House veto threat and passed legislation to repeal the estate tax that hits inherited assets worth $5.4 million or more.

By a mostly partisan 240-179 vote, the Republican-backed bill will be sent to the Senate, where Democrats are expected to use procedural hurdles to try to block it. Even if it passes the Senate, it would likely fail to achieve a two-thirds majority needed to override a veto.

House passage was timed for the week when most Americans file their tax returns. Conservatives, who refer to the estate tax as the “death tax,” have long railed against it, arguing it hurts the families of small business owners and farmers.

“It’s past time to repeal this unacceptable tax. Every American deserves the ability to pass their life’s savings to their kids,” said Representative Tom Graves, a conservative Republican from Georgia.

Repealing the tax would boost the federal deficit by about $269 billion over 10 years, according to Congress’ Joint Committee on Taxation.

Few Americans pay the 40 percent tax on assets above the $5.4 million exclusion amount. About 5,400 estates, equal to 0.2 percent of taxpayers, will owe such taxes in 2015, according to the JCT.

(Reporting By Richard Cowan and David Lawder; Editing by Dan Grebler)

President Releases Major Tax Change Proposals

Information provided by:  Thompson Reuters

As outlined in a Fact Sheet released by the White House and a Jan. 17 conference call with reporters by senior administration officials, President Obama has proposed a number of tax increases that would generate revenue of approximately $320 billion over the next decade. He has suggested new and revised tax credits as well as a program to promote retirement savings. Among the President’s tax-related proposals are the following:
. . . an increase in capital gains and dividend tax rates to 28%; for couples, the 28% rate would apply where income is more than $500,000 annually;
. . . a fee of seven basis points on the amount of liabilities of financial institutions with assets greater than $50 billion. The fee on large, highly-leveraged financial institutions would
discourage excessive borrowing;
. . . a new tax credit worth up to $500 for households with two wage earners with combined income of up to $210,000. Families could claim a maximum credit equal to 5% of the first
$10,000 of earnings for the lower-earning spouse in a married couple. The maximum credit would be available to families with incomes up to $120,000, with a partial credit available to
couples with income up to $210,000;
. . . increasing the child tax credit to as much as $3,000 for each child under the age of five.  Families could claim a 50% credit for up to $6,000 of expenses per child under five. The
maximum credit for young children, older children, and elderly or disabled dependents would be available to families with incomes up to $120,000. In addition, enhanced benefits under the credit which are scheduled to expire after 2017 would be made permanent;
. . . making the following changes to the earned income tax credit (EITC) for workers without qualifying children: doubling the amount of the credit, increasing the income level at which the credit phases out, and making it available to workers age 21 and older. In addition, enhanced benefits under the credit which are scheduled to expire after 2017 would be made permanent;
. . . the consolidation of six education-related tax incentives into just two, while improving the American Opportunity Tax Credit (AOTC) to provide students up to $2,500 each year over five years as they work toward a college degree. The refundable portion of the AOTC would be increased to $1,500. Part- time students would be eligible for a $1,250 AOTC (up to $750
refundable). In addition, enhanced benefits under the AOTC credit which are scheduled to expire after 2017 would be made permanent;
. . . requiring employers with more than 10 employees that don’t have a 401(k) retirement plan to automatically enroll full- and part-time employees in an individual retirement account (for which small employers would receive tax credits to cover the costs involved); and

. . . the closing of the so-called “trust fund loophole” by requiring payment of capital gains tax on the increase in value of securities at the time they are inherited; however, for couples, no
tax would be due until the death of the second spouse. In addition, no tax would be due on inherited small, family-owned and operated businesses unless and until the business was
sold, and any closely-held business would have the option to pay tax on gains over 15 years.  Capital gains of up to $200,000 per couple ($100,000 per individual) could be bequeathed free of tax, with this exemption automatically portable between spouses. Couples would have an additional $500,000 exemption for personal residences ($250,000 per individual), with this exemption also automatically portable between spouses. Tangible personal property-other than expensive art and similar collectibles-(e.g. bequests or gifts of clothing, furniture, and small family heirlooms) would be tax-exempt.

 

WealthPoint Announces Financial Modeling Service to Advisor’s Clients

For Immediate Release

Media Contact: Chris Fiscus (602) 254-7312; ChrisFiscus@mosesanshell.com

PHOENIX, February 13, 2013 – WealthPoint, LLC, a leading provider of succession, exit and wealth transfer planning to affluent clients throughout the U.S., announced today they are making their proprietary financial modeling tool, IV,  available to their legal, tax and wealth management partners for use with their clients.

WealthPoint’s new service line will allow advisors to have access to the IV modeling tool for their clients, which was previously exclusively available to WealthPoint consulting clients. “IV, which stands for Instinct Verification, and is also a very intentional play on the word intravenous, provides a main line to the information clients need to make big decisions confidently.” said WealthPoint Managing Partner, Ryan Barradas.

The financial modeling tool helps clients see exactly where they are at in relation to macro goals in several areas of their financial life – financial independence, spousal security, estate transfer, business valuation, cash flow objectives and more.   In addition to establishing a credible baseline, the tool allows clients to evaluate the impact of their current planning, entity structure, etc. verses alternatives and then stress test it under various economic conditions and assumptions.  “We believe the only way to help clients make confident progress is through a careful process of Instinct Verification.” said Director of Business and Tax, Bailey Tocco, CPA.

“Affluent and/or entrepreneurial family groups instinctually know that a plan is only as good as the day you make it so any planning needs to be stress tested. No assumptions are 100% accurate so we do extensive financial modeling to test various unknown twists and turns their life will take after execution, including but not limited to ‘worst case’ scenarios,” said WealthPoint partner Tim Young. “Without this, smart people might move forward in planning for a little while, but when it comes time to execute they back away from the table. There’s simply too much at stake with their wealth, their business and their relationships to risk faltering.” said Barradas.

For a flat fee WealthPoint will model a client’s current situation layering their business and personal cash flows and balance sheets integrated with their current entity structure and planning strategies. Advisors can now provide their clients clarity and the assurance they need with the process WealthPoint has perfected with its own consulting clients. Through a streamlined process, WealthPoint will provide clients with access to their dynamic modeling tool along with an Executive Summary report describing their findings, strengths and weaknesses in the client’s current estate, business and financial planning strategies.  Clients will also meet with one of WealthPoint’s Partners and their Director of Business and Tax. In addition to baseline financial modeling, WealthPoint will provide continued scenario modeling, brainstorming and consulting at a blended hourly rate.

About WealthPoint, LLC

WealthPoint, LLC is headquartered in Phoenix, Arizona and specializes in providing a holistic approach to succession, exit and wealth transfer planning. WealthPoint serves affluent families and middle-market, family-owned and controlled companies throughout the United States. The company’s unique process combines thorough discovery, collaborative and flexible solutions, and an unbridled commitment to implementation and on-going support. WealthPoint is an Affiliate firm of M Financial Group, one of the nation’s premier financial services design and distribution companies, serving the ultra-affluent and corporate markets through an exclusive network of more than 125 of the nation’s most successful and innovative financial services firms. More information is available at www.wealthpoint.net.